What’s so fabulous about fibre?

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We are only just beginning to explore the intricacies of how the food we eat interacts with our bodies and in particular, our gut microbiota (the incredible 100 trillion bacteria that live in our digestive system). Fibre is a vital part of what can be called your ‘way of life’ or your daily normal diet (click here to see my previous post on ‘Which diet is best for me?’). The aim of this article is to share the evidence on the benefits of fibre, where we can get it from and how we can apply this to our everyday. 

The WHY of FIBRE.

Looking into the importance and benefits of fibre will hopefully encourage you to welcome it into your day wherever and however you can.

FIRST BENEFIT: Fibre has hormonal effects.

What is a hormone and how does it relate to fibre?

The word Hormone is Greek for ‘set in motion’. If you imagine a hormone like a parent on a mission, intent on getting things done; hormones are chemicals that travel to certain organs and exert a specific effect in order to make things happen.

An example is the fascinating hormone Insulin which is remarkably designed to allow the body to utilise sugar/glucose from the food we eat to be used as fuel (sugar is essential for our survival, click here to read more on why). Insulin is able to unlock cells, in effect telling the body to absorb this energy source for immediate use or to store it for later.

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How is insulin linked to fibre?

The fibre in your meal adds bulk to your food, which means it takes longer to chew and travel through the body, slowing down the digestive process. This slowing down means that food takes longer to leave the stomach and longer for the digested food to be absorbed into the bloodstream. This results in a delayed release of sugar into the blood and a delayed release of the hormone Insulin.

Why is this so important?

Dr Jason Fung, Canadian kidney specialist describes the action of Insulin similar to the railway guards in Japan called ‘pushers’. The job of these ‘pushers’ is to cram as many people onto the subway trains as they can during peak time. Similarly, Insulin is released by the body after eating highly refined carbohydrates, for example,  to ‘push’ the sugar efficiently into our cells. With the sugar now being taken up by the cells, there can be a sudden drop in blood sugar which if persists in some people can cause feelings of hunger, tiredness, fatigue and dizziness- symptoms of what we may call a ‘sugar crash’.

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Part 3 – Sleep & Diet

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PART 3 – Using Sleep to hack diet

 

Our body has many intricate and fascinating communication systems, one of which is based on chemical messengers called Hormones.

We have  2 main hunger hormones that remind me of gremlins they are called :

 

Leptin, which is released to tell us we are full:

‘Ok chaps,  all good down here, no more food needed’

and

 Ghrelin which tells us we are running on empty:

‘Ok guys we are running on low, in need of food- send some down now’.

These hormones work together to try to keep our intake of food at the levels required for survival.

Sleep And Hormones

It has been shown that in healthy adults 4 to 5 hours sleep reduces Leptin and increases Ghrelin.  This means that our ability to know when we have eaten enough is impaired and we feel more hunger and get more signals telling us to eat.

 

Sleep And Risk Of Weight Gain

Sleep loss has been shown to result in an average 200-300 more calories eaten every day.   This equals to a 10-15lb increase in fat mass in one year- just from sleep deprivation.

 

Sleep And Choices Of Food

Studies have shown that lack of sleep may inhibit our ability to make better food choices and we have a strong tendency to choose a diet of processed carbohydrates and refined sugars such as white bread, pasta, cookies and ice cream.

 

The Less You Sleep, The More You Eat

Less than 7 hours of sleep affects your body’s ability to process sugar, so not only do we eat more of the wrong foods, we are less able to handle the extra sugar we tend to crave.

Chronic sleep deprivation of fewer than 6 hours is now recognised as a contributing factor to Type  2 Diabetes.

 

WHERE’S THE GOOD NEWS?

Giving yourself a prescription of 7 -9 hours of sleep every day will help you:

  • Control bodyweight and reduce weight gain
  • Have a better ability to process sugar
  • Reduce the risk of getting Type 2 Diabetes
  • Lose fat mass rather than muscle mass and help you become leaner
  • Calm your nervous system; less stress and therefore less need for fuel and sugar.

 

In Part 4  –  SO How DO we sleep better?